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Tag Archives: Yellowstone Club

New West Daily Roundup for Sept. 29, 2016

Today in New West news: judge orders Yellowstone Club founder pay $286 million to creditors, U.S. Forest Service proposes “cultural shift,” and living in an Idaho shipping container.

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New West Daily Roundup for July 26, 2016

Today in New West news: court rules against Yellowstone Club founder Tim Blixseth, 2016’s “Best-Run Cities in America,” and UnitedHeathcare to purchase Rocky Mountain Health Plans.

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When Ed Anacker Made Cyclists Eat His Dust

John Anacker and his brothers grew up in the shadow of an outdoor legend when their town was a different place and the West a different kind of region. As the sons of Bozeman's legendary athletic hedonist Ed Anacker, now a spry octogenarian, they remember slogs with their patriarch who defined himself by acts of extreme physical endurance — this in an age well before the word "ultra" and lucrative sponsorship deals ever entered the vocabulary of American recreation. As the longtime head of the chemistry department at Montana State University, Ed Anacker in his free time put men one third his age to shame, including when he designed the brutal course of the notorious Ed Anacker Bridger Ridge Run held every summer in Bozeman. In writer John Anacker's first essay about his father, he chronicled a climb to the pinnacle of Montana's highest summit, Granite Peak. With this sweet second piece, he tells the tale of what happened when his dad raced a beater bike against the fashion and techno mavens of modern cycling. —Todd Wilkinson

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Daydreams On Buying The $155 Million Symbol Of Material Excess

After timber baron-turned-real estate developer Tim Blixseth boasted last week in Forbes that he is building a $155 million spec home in his super-rich enclave called The Yellowstone Club near Big Sky, Montana, many citizens of the West responded not with envy or inspiration, but disbelief and derision aimed at the sheer in-your-face decadence of Blixseth's latest attempt to seize public attention and cash in for himself. Here, in this piece from David Nolt, senior editor for the Livingston Weekly newspaper, the reporter summons a dream of his own—picking up the phone and calling Mr. Blixseth to make an offer on this latest example of material excess.

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How The American West Is Being Won And Lost

Jonathan Schechter, a popular "lifestyle statistician" from Jackson Hole, opened up New West's successful Real Estate and Development Conference last autumn with one of the more provocative analyses of why some communities are prospering -- and likely to be buffered somewhat from a deflating real estate bubble nationally -- and why others may not. In an interview with New West today, Schechter talks about the difference between "growth" and "change" in the northern Rockies, how the the new mobility of workers is affecting the region and what Schechter's hometown of Jackson Hole has to teach the rest of the West. Read on for the interview.

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Bozeman Leader Responds To His Town’s Impugned Honor

It definitely touched a raw nerve. When Stephen Matlow, editor of the Livingston Enterprise newspaper, wrote an editorial recently calling high and mighty Bozeman, Montana "butt ugly", a town rapidly losing its community soul, many citizens residing in Matlow's intended target reacted with the outrage of defensiveness. Current Bozeman City Commissioner Steve Kirchhoff, a former mayor and home-grown community leader who was once a school teacher in urban Chicago but in the 1990s with his physician wife decided to return to his native town to raise their family, took Matlow's semi-satirical observations to heart. And Kirchhoff's own assessment may surprise you. Like former Missoula Mayor Dan Kemmis [now director of the O'Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West], Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson and others, Kirchhoff believes that what defines the modern West is not just the innovative approaches being employed to make money or selling real estate -- an improvement over the boom and bust days of frontier gold rushes -- but its capacity to see community as something more than economic, social and religious homogeneity. For Kirchhoff, it's the stuff that doesn't appear on ledger books that matters just as much as what's visible in statistics to bean counters. —Todd Wilkinson

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Bozeman’s Community Food Co-op Wrestles With Its Own Success

Bozeman's Community Food Co-op, in its distinctive metallic-silver building that looks like a retro-grain elevator on Main Street (located, interestingly enough, across from Safeway), is in the minds of its ardent patrons the very paragon of rebellion against Big Box stores, industrialization of food commodities, and material-driven conspicuous consumption. Be a Yokel, Buy Local is the catchphrase. Yet what happens when the Co-op's own startling success forces it to grow and expand its footprint and staff? Ah, a fascinating dilemma. Only four years ago did the Co-op move into its brand new space—gargantuan, then— that is already outgrown. The Co-op now has over 150 employees spread across four buildings in 10 departments, an annual payroll of $2.6 million, and a 12 percent growth rate in which 140 new members are being added to the rolls every month. In this bit of reflection, Co-op general manager Kelly Dean Wiseman ponders the fledging from a once quaint mom and pop-sized operation to something a bit more, well, supersized. Can the Co-op remain different from the food markets that it long has stood in contrast against? Can it maintain its identity?

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