Sunday, October 22, 2017
Breaking News
Home » Tag Archives: suicide

Tag Archives: suicide

A Glimmer of Hope, A Break in the Cycle

Mary Borris and Maureen O'Malley met only once, at the Suicide Awareness Memorial Walk in October. But both women face the same question every day: how to confront suicide. It begins, for O'Malley, with openness. She organized the walk and invited media, and the media came, cautiously. Confronting suicide requires education, too, O'Malley said. It requires mental health agencies putting aside their turf wars and working together, she said. And it requires time and money. For Mary Borris, confronting suicide means talking openly about death with her children. When Mary got a copy of the coroner's report and of photos of Stephen's jail cell in December, David and Kodi sandwiched her on the couch as she looked at them. They asked her to explain how he hung himself, and she did: by kneeling into a noose tied with a sheet on the bunk bed above. Mary believes that the healthy way to confront suicide with her children is to be unwaveringly open. It is as if talking about the tragedies reasonably can lessen the emotional monstrosity of death.

Read More »

Suicide Prevention Comes Down to Dollars, Attitude and Access

By 5 p.m. on a new autumn day last October, about two-dozen people stood in the park, waiting for the county's inaugural Suicide Memorial Awareness Walk to begin. It was a big moment for Maureen O'Malley, the coordinator of the Missoula City-County Health Department's suicide prevention network. Her position is less than three years old, and she is charged with the weighty task of decreasing the number of suicides in Missoula County. The job is 15 hours a week. Part-time. O'Malley's budget is anemic. There was a $10,000 governor's grant given to her office and to four other Montana counties last year. Otherwise "it's a matter of eking some dollars out of the current health department budget," she said. O'Malley's equivalent until November in Cascade County was Susie McIntyre, who puts the fiscal woes more bluntly. "Suicide prevention in Montana can come down to money, and yet we haven't invested in it in any systematic way," she said.

Read More »

A Deadly Equation: Suicide in the West

The dead were named. They were remembered. Then, in the hallway of St. Anthony Parish, there was an awkward shuffle to day-to-day conversation between strangers as the group moved towards a folding table with homemade cookies. The inaugural Suicide Memorial Awareness Walk in Missoula ended here. Moments earlier a circle of 22 mourners spoke the names of loved ones- some in whispers, some with breaking voices, some holding a defiantly steady tone. Kodi Borris, a ponytailed eight-year-old, stepped toward the center the hushed circle. "Stephen," she said quietly. "Stephen," repeated the group of mourners. Stephen is Stephen Adam Borris, Kodi’s stepbrother, who hung himself while in the Hill County Jail in Havre on May 11, 2004.

Read More »

Did Utah Kill John Wayne? Part IV: Well, Did It?

By Clint Wardlow, UtahGothic.com Well, Did It? Is the Beehive State responsible for John Wayne's death? Certainly its irradiated dirt may have had something to do with it. But if Utah is the killer, it has plenty of accomplices. Howard Hughes is a major suspect. R.J. Reynolds shoulders a large portion of the blame. The Atomic Energy Commission may be the main villain in all of this.

Read More »

Did Utah Kill John Wayne? Part III: Folks Start Dying

By Clint Wardlow, UtahGothic.com Folks Start Dying Pedro Armendariz had been a familiar face to Americans for many years. He had co-starred with John Wayne in the Three Godfathers and Fort Apache. He was also a bone fide star in his native Mexico. Early in June 1963, Armendariz had finished shooting one of his most memorable roles as Karim Bey in the second James Bond movie From Russia With Love. He was guest of honor at a June 9 party given by the film producers. Nine days later, Armendariz shot himself in his bed at the UCLA Medical Center. The actor had committed suicide rather than face a protracted death from lymph cancer. Armendariz had also co-starred with John Wayne in The Conqueror.

Read More »

Did Utah Kill John Wayne? Part II: Atomic Bombs and Dead Sheep

By Clint Wardlow, UtahGothic.com Atomic Bombs and Dead Sheep Local prospectors had been reporting finds on their Geiger counters that indicated large caches of uranium. The problem was that once they began digging, the uranium never turned up. Also, local ranchers had been suffering a spate of mysterious livestock deaths. Many suspected it may be due to the atomic bomb tests a short distance away at Yucca Flats in Nevada. However, the feds assured locals the tests were perfectly safe. Any fallout would be minimal and dissipate quickly. And everyone knows the government would never lie to its own citizens. That would be unethical.

Read More »

Did Utah Kill John Wayne?

By Clint Wardlow, UtahGothic.com The Conqueror is one of those legendary cursed Hollywood movies. The brainchild of eccentric billionaire and aviator Howard Hughes, the historical epic cast John Wayne as Temujin (a.k.a. Genghis Khan). It was a bad idea from the start; destined for failure in the form of bad box office and critical derision. This aside, The Conqueror has a more troubling legacy. Six of its main players kicked the bucket, possibly as a direct result of working on this film. Veteran character actors Pedro Armendariz (suicide) and Lee Van Cleef (natural causes) were causalities. However it was the deaths of the three leads and its actor-turned-director that raised eyebrows. Susan Hayward, Dick Powell, Agnes Moorehead and the duke himself, John Wayne, all died from cancer.

Read More »

John Cusack’s Woody Creek Blank

Disclaimer: I love the actor John Cusack. I’ve seen just about everything he’s ever done. My favorite movie of all time is “Grosse Pointe Blank" for his gonzo portrayal of a hit man who returns to his tenth reunion with a contract out on his old girlfriend’s father. With Jeremy Piven installed as the high school sidekick, it just doesn’t get any better, or darker, than that. It will thus come as no surprise to noirish John Cusack nabobs that he was present and accounted for at the memorial service in downtown Aspen for the going-going-gonzo word-whacker Dr. Hunter S. Thompson Jr. The Doctor, a fear-and-loathing fixture in Aspen since the 1960s, had committed suicide some days before with his wife on the phone and his grandchild in his house at Owl Farm in Woody Creek, Colorado. Months after his passing, in the summer of 2006, Thompson’s ashes would be scattered across the face of Woody Creek in a $2.5 million drug-induced ceremony paid for by another actor, Johnny Depp. But what might come as something of an eye-opener is Cusack’s account of the day at Owl Farm after the memorial service. Cusack, at least for that brief wink of time, took it upon himself to become the late Dr. Thompson’s Boswell, the unassuming acolyte with a notebook and pencil in hand, eager to jot down every jot of genius. The day after the memorial services, months before the author’s ashes would fly, Cusack took inventory of Hunter Thompson’s life at Owl Farm, beginning with the cocktails that greeted well-wishers. “Outside," Cusack writes, “his wife offered liquid acid to people in the driveway."

Read More »

Searching For Hunter Thompson

Going, going, gonzo. As the final preparations take place for the cannon blast from the two-thumbed 150-foot tower, Hunter Thompson’s remains remain as controversial as his body of work. Actor Johnny Depp, who played the late gonzo journalist in “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, is footing the bill for a memorial service six months after the writer’s suicide that will literally shoot his remains from a cannon out over Woody Creek. The ceremony will be private and limited to invited guests, and like a solid rocket booster on the launching pad the structure is already in place.

Read More »