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Home » New West Network Topics » Travel & Outdoors » Snow Blog » Wilderness Ski Film Nixed by Forest Service, Cloud Seeding at Vail, and Wooden Skis
Some spectacular video footage of skiing on Colorado’s highest peaks may never be seen by the public, after the U.S. Forest Service decided it wouldn’t issue a retro-active permit to extreme skier Chris Davenport and his team for a project documenting his attempt to ski all of the state’s 14,000-foot peaks during a single year. The reasoning behind the decision is a strict U.S. Forest Service policy that denies commercial filming in Congressionally designated wilderness areas, unless the resulting film contributes directly to the purpose of why the wilderness was established, Jason Blevins of the Denver Post reported in a Dec. 5 story. According to the Post, Davenport wanted to use the film to raise money for nonprofits like the Roaring Fork Avalanche Center and the Colorado Fourteeners Initiative. But the Forest Service decided that the project didn’t meet the criteria. The issue isn’t unique to Davenport's project. The Post article goes on to explain that Wyoming-based Teton Gravity Research paid a $1,000 fine to the Forest Service last year for filming a record-breaking cliff jump in the backcountry near Grand Targheee. The filmmakers had a permit to film the take-off area, but not for the landing zone in the wilderness below.

Wilderness Ski Film Nixed by Forest Service, Cloud Seeding at Vail, and Wooden Skis

Some spectacular video footage of skiing on Colorado’s highest peaks may never be seen by the public, after the U.S. Forest Service decided it wouldn’t issue a retro-active permit to extreme skier Chris Davenport and his team for a project documenting his attempt to ski all of the state’s 14,000-foot peaks during a single year. The reasoning behind the decision is a strict U.S. Forest Service policy that denies commercial filming in Congressionally designated wilderness areas, unless the resulting film contributes directly to the purpose of why the wilderness was established, Teton Gravity Research paid a $1,000 fine to the Forest Service last year for filming a record-breaking cliff jump in the backcountry near Grand Targheee. The filmmakers had a permit to film the take-off area, but not for the landing zone in the wilderness below.

In it’s weekly snow sport section, Vail is enjoying a phenomenal start to the season. During recent days, the Colorado mega-resort has opened vast reaches of its storied Back Bowls, and is now operating 24 lifts on 3,240 acres, with powder and packed powder conditions on most trails. It’s not like this area needs any extra publicity, but conditions for early December are top-notch. Who knows, maybe it’s the cloud-seeding that Vail has now been doing for 30 years. Check out Yerman’s boards here. The pros and cons of modern day wooden skis have also been discussed at some length on the Telemark Tips web forum. Look for an in-depth story on these $165 boards here in the New West Snowblog.

And if you missed yesterday’s edition, click here for some interesting insight into how this year’s El Niño might affect your powder quest the rest of the season.

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