Wednesday, July 23, 2014
What's New in the New West
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Less can be more. The end is not nigh. The real estate market -- including second-home and resort markets -- will recover … eventually. Predictions and advice about opportunity, realism, smart growth, environmentalism -- and a slow-paced recovery -- were the hallmarks of NewWest.net’s fourth annual Real Estate Development in the Northern Rockies conference in Missoula. The two-day event, which ended yesterday at the Hilton Garden Inn, included more than 30 speakers who discussed wide-ranging topics about development, planning, land use and the future of the West. The boom-and-bling era of speculation and eye-popping returns on real estate have obviously vanished, said the planners, architects, developers, policy makers, real estate agents, green builders and others who took the stage. But the current economic downturn could fuel a shift that benefits people and the planet, speakers said. When smart growth replaces sprawl, when developers are good neighbors, when downtowns are revitalized and landscapes are preserved, the region will be protected from ugly booms and busts. -

Real Estate Market in the West: Where It’s Going, and How

Less can be more. The end is not nigh. The real estate market — including second-home and resort markets — will recover … eventually.

Predictions and advice about opportunity, realism, smart growth, environmentalism — and a slow-paced recovery — were the hallmarks of NewWest.net’s fourth annual Real Estate Development in the Northern Rockies conference in Missoula. The two-day event, which ended yesterday at the Hilton Garden Inn, included more than 30 speakers who discussed wide-ranging topics about development, planning, land use and the future of the West.

The boom-and-bling era of speculation and eye-popping returns on real estate have obviously vanished, said the planners, architects, developers, policy makers, real estate agents, green builders and others who took the stage. But the current economic downturn could fuel a shift that benefits people and the planet, speakers said. When smart growth replaces sprawl, when developers are good neighbors, when downtowns are revitalized and landscapes are preserved, the region will be protected from ugly booms and busts.

“It’s really about going back to simplicity,” said Rebecca Zimmermann, an owner of the Denver-based Design Workshop. At the worst moments of the economic crisis, clients told her “every dream I ever had is on hold,” Zimmermann said. “Now, with the stock market back up, there is desire again to have a dream home,” she said — but the dream has changed.

“People want to live in places that connect people to nature and connect people to their families,” she said. “The days of the inter-west buyers who were refinancing their primary home and taking that money out to buy a condo at Copper Mountain — that almost doesn’t exist any more.”

Most speakers said it will be three-to-five years or more before there’s recovery and stability in the real estate market.

But property is still selling, even in the very high-end market. Samuel Byrne,
the new owner of the Yellowstone Club, said in an on-stage interview that the exclusive ski-and-golf resort has seen $50 million in sales since he closed on the property in July. Some of the sales were distressed properties and buyers cut deals directly with the banks.

“People swooped in very quickly on those and snapped them up,” said Byrne, the managing partner of CrossHarbor Capital Partners, a Boston-based investment firm. With Byrne’s leadership in place — and the Tim and Edra Blixseth saga over — the demand returned. “It’s truly a unique asset — one of the most unique properties in the world,” Byrne said.

But how is the rest of the West faring? What’s changed? Here are some answers and conference highlights:

– “The second home market is not gone — people will make extraordinary buys coming out of this cycle,” said Byrne. “At certain price points there will be tremendous opportunities and recovery in the marketplace.”

– Consumers have shifted away from seeing real estate as an investment. Many of today’s home-buyers want property that’s greener, smaller and more long-term. “It’s more about what people want for their family,” said Christopher Kelsey, of Steeplechase Development Advisors.

– Eco-friendliness is a deal-clincher for increasing numbers of buyers. From the builder’s perspective, sustainable buildings can also qualify for money-saving tax credit programs and subsidies.

– People come to Montana to enjoy small towns and wild landscapes, so protecting those assets with smart growth plans is critical, said Luther Propst, founder of the Sonoran Institute.

– Well-heeled home buyers are looking for quality-of-life landscapes: places where they can see wildlife, go fishing and skiing, and play outdoors, said Roger Lang Jr., who transformed his 26,000-acre Sun Ranch in southwest Montana into an eco-lodge — and a home to everything from boreal toads and bald eagles to grizzly bears. “Wealthy, high-end home-buyers subsidize wildlife conservation,” said Lang.

– Healthy downtowns and residential areas are walk-able, compact, sustainable environments with neighborhood centers, open spaces, mixed housing (including single-family and multi-family buildings), and increased connectivity, to reduce reliance on vehicles. Turning these visions into reality isn’t easy, but it’s possible. “Many small towns may have not had significant planning or investment since the Works Progress Administration, when they got their first paved roads in the 1940s,” said Stefan Pellegrini of Opticos Design in Berkeley, Calif. “Planning continues to be contentious in these places, but they’re small enough so you can achieve consensus.”

– Businesses seeking to build can take advantage of a new tax credit program from the U.S. Treasury for new construction in distressed census tracts. The program (which has admittedly tight restrictions) helped the Garlington, Lohn & Robinson law firm construct a $14 million, six-story green office building in downtown Missoula, without having to put up the standard $4-plus million in cash that banks would typically want for such a project.

– Green building today has evolved into an art form. Builders can insulate down to the slab to keep air and moisture out of buildings. They can use 95-percent-efficient gas-fired condensing boilers; Energy Star appliances; high-efficiency toilets that only use 1.28 gallons of water per flush; high-efficiency fans instead of air conditioners; and smart irrigation with built-in mini-weather stations, so the sprinklers don’t go on after it rains, said green-building expert Jeff Medanich, of the Colorado Chautauqua Association.

– Green buildings can put green in your wallet. The Garlington building, which aims to be LEED gold certified, will have solar collectors on the roof to heat hot water, solar photovoltaic collectors to generate about 2 percent of the building’s energy use, natural lighting, recycling collection rooms, a high-efficiency radiant heating and cooling system, a reduced floor-to-floor height (to reduce building volume), and high performance solar-control glazing and sun shades, said the architect for the project, Marty Noyd of OZ Architects. The height reduction alone saved $465,000 in the building cost, he said.

In the end, even the wealthiest home and landowners want to take a breath, reassess and avoid any more tumult, as Sam Byrne of the Yellowstone Club put it. It’s time to achieve peace in the valley, he said. “The club’s goal now is to stabilize itself, stabilize its reputation, and not sell a lot in the next three years,” he said. He intends to offer more townhouses and condos in the future, put more land into conservation, and put eco-friendly measures in place.

“Less sprawl, more open space, with clustered developed that’s designed to be sustainable and environmentally friendly — that’s the goal that everyone’s been talking about today, and it’s not different at the high end of the marketplace,” said Byrne. With a few exceptions, he joked. Buyers might arrive in a private jet before they drive off in their Prius.

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Comments

  1. Chester says:

    What a bunch of realtor horse #*#*! Up here in Whitefish nothing and I mean NOTHING is moving! During the summer we had around 100 homes on the market for over a million, now we have over 160. I wouldn’t care so much because most of these homes were bought overpriced to begin with, but because they continue to put downward pressure on the price of all homes in the valley, even the ones like mine selling at a reasonable price, everyone suffers. Anyways, it’s just frustrating to hear how peachy things are when you look through the rose colored glasses of a realtor even though everyone else knows otherwise.

  2. Mel says:

    Right on Chester. These self promoters are the same ones that got us into this bubble and ruined our economy. How many clever little failed rural developments did Design Workshop consult on and promote all across the west?
    I’ve been watching one lake house that has been in desperation sale mode for the last 2 years. The asking price has gone from 1.2 million , to 900,000 to make me an offer. 600k may get it.
    Lakefront lots are now worth $1500 a foot and as soon as the speculators and lenders take the hit the better.

  3. lfehl says:

    unfortunately an unintended consequence of the bubble is the mess the property taxes now are across Montana. Montana families may lose those “legacy” lakefront properties to out of staters because the income base in Montana certainly did not keep pace with the real estate boom…and now the taxes for residents is based upon what someone with out of state incomes could pay for property. This could cause the next wave of fire sales in the “higher end” locations.

    NewWest…it would really be nice if this text box had a spell checker built into it…it would certainly help us poor typists…

  4. Joe says:

    I don’t buy the bit about “wealthy, high-end home-buyers subsidize wildlife conservation,” for one second. Wealthy home-buyers are fueling the explosion of exurban development that is consuming open space in the West like wildfire. (The notable difference being, of course, that exurban development is quite a bit more permanent than wildfire.) This demographic doesn’t tend to buy existing homes near urban centers–the environmentally-concious thing to do–and everybody knows it. They like to build big, conspicuously gaudy monstrosities on a picturesque piece of land that’s big enough to maintain an air of exclusivity and, well, wealth. These development practices are leading to a net loss of open space. How, pray tell, does this subsidize wildlife?I don’t know what Mr. Lang’s background is, but I suspect he’s seeing critters like boreal toads and bald eagles on his property and making the shaky cognitive leap from correlation to causation and concluding that because he built an eco-lodge, and he’s seeing wildlife, his eco-lodge must be good for wildlife. For a more rigorous, scientific examination of the effects of exurban development’s effects on biodiversity, see: http://www.homepage.montana.edu/~hansen/documents/downloadables/hansenetal2005_2.pdf

    The short of it is this: Mr. Lang is blowing smoke up your butt. Wildlife needs more wealthy home-builders like Montana needs more Californians (wait…)

  5. masswasting says:

    Nice points, Joe. The unholy alliance between realtors/developers/builders and mainstream environmental groups needs more discussion. Instead the same elites who know “what people want” are controlling the entire discourse, just like they usually do. Anyone remember the fabulous “green”, “state-of-art”, “community-oriented”, potentially LEED certified Story Mill project in Bozeman? It was self-proclaimed environmentalists and progressives who displaced the occupants of 130 trailers. Apparently, the jerks trumpeting the project didn’t even know how their financing worked. Some of these same assholes are strutting around Bozeman wringing their hands about the devastation downtown and penning cutsey articles in the Bozeman Daily Comical about sustainability. Every single person involved with Story Mill should pack up and move to Enid, Oklahoma. They’ll love it there & the Enidians will REALLY love you.

  6. Tom Page says:

    Joe-

    You may want to take a look at the history of Sun Ranch before you attack Roger Lang for his comment. That property probably does more for wildlife in the Madison River Valley than any other, and it was pretty much one big knapweed patch (at least what I could see from the road) when it was owned by Seagal. It’s not perfect by any means, but it’s much better than the mess around Raynolds Pass and Island Park – a nightmare for migrating wildlife.

    I’m guessing he’s referring to large purchases by wealthy landowners like Ted Turner and Mr. Lang, who have the deep pockets available to do landscape restoration on a large scale, not the guy who buys 10 acres outside Driggs and puts up a big ugly mansion, as I think you have in mind.

  7. Rod Proffitt says:

    Things have changed, and successful communities will adapt to the changes of the market. I do not believe the second home market will recover. It is my guess though the burgeoning population will continue to drive people to communities with amenities, and outlying communities from metro areas. However, unless good connectivity with inter-modal accessible and affordable transportation is available, those communities will eventually fail on the down-side of peak oil.

  8. LovetheOutdoors says:

    “I don’t buy the bit about “wealthy, high-end home-buyers subsidize wildlife conservation,” for one second. Wealthy home-buyers are fueling the explosion of exurban development that is consuming open space in the West like wildfire.”

    Totally agreed Joe. These wealthy home buyers generally aren’t even smart enough to get out of their driveways during winter unless someone plows it for them.

    They move here to “live in the open” then want all of the amenities they would have in the city. They want it all and I don’t feel bad for a single one of them.