Breaking News
Home » New West Blog » AUDIO FEATURE: Voices From the New West Festival
The New West Festival in May brought together an eclectic group of Rocky Mountain enthusiasts and entrepreneurs who examined the quality of life, work and play in the region. From an opening keynote about climate change, with practical solutions for reducing carbon footprints, to a closing session about entrepreneurism and the funding of new businesses, the day was packed with interesting ideas for personal and professional growth.

AUDIO FEATURE: Voices From the New West Festival

The New West Festival in May brought together an eclectic group of Rocky Mountain enthusiasts and entrepreneurs who examined the quality of life, work and play in the region. From an opening keynote about climate change, with practical solutions for reducing carbon footprints, to a closing session about entrepreneurism and the funding of new businesses, the day was packed with interesting ideas for personal and professional growth.

The hallways were alive with vibrant discussions, and the participants shared a deep interest in and great respect for this region. Lacy Roberts, an independent radio producer, spent some time with the speakers and panelists. A mix of those recorded conversations can be found at the link below. If you missed hearing from Jim Nichols, Diane Smith or Courtney Lowery Cowgill, this audio file will give you some highlights of who they are and how they view the Rockies.

Audio 4:25 minutes

 

About New West Editor

Check Also

AP: Feds Knew Wood Piles Could Further Contaminate Libby, Montana

An Associated Press investigation discovered that the Environmental Protection Agency, in charge of clearing asbestos concentrated in Libby, Montana -- the deadliest Superfund site in America -- has known for at least three years that piles of wood chips and bark people put in their yards and parks contained asbestos. According to an AP story published today, the EPA "did not stop removal of the material" until reporters began investigating in early March. The levels of the contamination and its effects on humans are not known, according to the story, "EPA documents obtained by the AP showed that the agency found potentially deadly asbestos fibers in four of 20 samples taken from the piles of scrap wood in 2007."